You are using an outdated browser. For a faster, safer browsing experience, upgrade for free today.
Anuncios M
o nosso MÁGICO Estádio AXA no jornal de economia Financial Times
9 Respostas
3417 Visualizações
0 Membros e 1 Visitante estão a ver este tópico.
(S)oon(C)hampions(B)raga Equipa Principal
  • *****
  • 4986
apesar de a notícia já ter un tempos... leiam tudo que está interessante a notícia

‘You’ve beaten them once. Now do it again...’

By Simon Kuper

Published: May 11 2007 18:05 | Last updated: May 11 2007 18:05

With its very first match, Wembley Stadium acquired its defining myth. The story of the “White Horse Final”, the 1923 FA Cup final between Bolton Wanderers and West Ham United, is worth examining for what it reveals about Wembley’s place in the British psyche. What happened was a near disaster: up to 240,000 people crammed into the ground, almost twice Wembley’s capacity at the time, and probably the largest crowd ever at a football match. There was a crush and nearly 1,000 casualties were treated.

But, according to the myth, far worse was averted thanks to mounted police constable George Scorey and his white horse. Together they pushed back the thousands spilling on to the pitch before the match “Now, those in front join hands,” Scorey called out. They did and began retreating step by step. “The horse was very good,” Scorey recalled in 1944, “easing them back with his nose and his tail.” Bolton won 2-0, helped, it is said, by the odd trip of an opponent or telling pass from the hordes massed on the touchline.

The “White Horse Final” provided Wembley with the perfect myth. The horse evokes the stadium’s timeless appeal: so old as to be almost pre-technology. The hordes represent mass passion. And the story’s gentle resolution evokes Wembley’s sporting spirit: in place of strife, harmony. Almost uniquely among the world’s football grounds, Wembley doesn’t house a club. It is non-partisan, the national stadium, sitting above the game.

But for almost seven years the British have been without Wembley. In 2000, after one last dismal defeat against Germany, the old stadium was demolished. Next weekend, however, at a cost of £800m and four years late, the new Wembley will host its first FA Cup final, when Manchester United play Chelsea. The task of the new Wembley is to preserve the spirit of the old one: to be a shrine to Britishness, ancestor-worship, and to fandom itself.

It’s appropriate that the new Wembley will officially open with an FA Cup final because the final has always been the stadium’s chief ritual. The game is a spring rite of celebration, whereas international matches, also played at Wembley, tend to be autumn evenings of anguish.

The FA Cup final belongs to everyone in English football. Dozens of clubs have played in it and their supporters all sing the same songs about it: “Que sera, sera,” “We’ll really shake them up/When we win the FA Cup,” and, before the game itself, in unison, the hymn “Abide with me.” This harmony is unique in an industry whose driving passion is hate: always for the opponents, often for their stadium (Manchester City fans have serenaded the wartime bombing of Manchester United’s ground), sometimes for your own team, and even for yourself for watching them. Only Wembley transcends this.

The fans’ ritual on FA Cup final day is unchanging. For years I lived just off Baker Street in central London, the place where supporters gather before cramming on to Tube trains bound for Wembley. They would drink beer in the sun and then, in search of a discreet side street, come and urinate against my house. Once I scolded a urinator from my window: “Handy isn’t it, if you don’t live here?” “It is very convenient, yes,” he replied. I’m sure people were urinating there in 1923.

Wembley contains football’s past but also the fan’s personal past. When you go to a stadium, you remember being taken there as a child. That’s much of the point of being a sports fan. How many other buildings do you visit all your life? As the Dutch football poet Henk Spaan has written, a stadium is

A monument to all fathers who are already dead

A monument to the common man.

And whatever was happening in Britain from 1923 to 2000, Wembley was always there, stolid, ugly and suburban. On June 8 1940, the Germans seemed on the point of invading Britain. They were already invading France, and the British Expeditionary Force had just fled Dunkirk in an armada of little boats. But that afternoon, 42,399 football supporters, in heroic denial of reality, were at Wembley stadium watching West Ham v Blackburn in the War Cup Final.

During the first half, word went round the crowd that an important announcement was to be made at half-time. Roy Peskett, a sportswriter attending, thought perhaps the Germans had landed. Instead the announcer said: “There are six heroes here today. Men who have just come back from Dunkirk, been to the depots and got refitted, and come here to watch the football match!”

Like most British traditions, Wembley has often been more appreciated by foreigners. Pele, who never played a match there, once took a ball on to the empty pitch and, like a schoolchild pretending to be Pele, kicked it into the empty net. He called the stadium “the church of football”. In Istanbul once, I met Fatih Uraz, Turkey’s goalkeeper on the day they lost 8-0 to England at Wembley in 1987. Was that the worst day of his career? “No!” said Uraz. “It was a nice memory for me, because I showed my effort. All my career I wanted to play in Wembley. If I got another chance to play there, even if I conceded 15 goals, no problem.”

Yet the old Wembley had to go. After the Hillsborough disaster of 1989, in which 96 Liverpool fans were crushed to death in an outdated stadium, billions of pounds were spent modernising big British football grounds. A similar process happened in the US at about the same time – “the ballpark renaissance” – and around Europe.

Jacques Herzog, the Swiss architect who in 2001 with his childhood friend Pierre de Meuron won the Pritzker prize chiefly for designing London’s Tate Modern art museum, designed Munich’s stadium for last year’s World Cup, Basel’s for next year’s European football championship and is now finishing Beijing’s Olympic Stadium. His Basel ground, he told me, “was the first of the new football stadiums to be built by a famous architect. A stadium has the potential to be like an opera house. Nobody ever said that before.” He meant that whereas cities once derived status from their cathedrals, and later from their opera houses, they now do so from their stadiums.

Beside these new arenas, Wembley looked embarrassing. Like most elderly British football grounds, it dated from an era when stadiums were built on the cheap, without architectural pretensions. “For many years, within British sport especially, stadium architects were looked down upon with almost as much contempt as journalists,” says Simon Inglis, author of the seminal Football Grounds of England and Wales and several other books on the subject (few topics are so dominated by one writer, evidence of how, until relatively recently, stadiums have been neglected). The Empire Stadium, as it was originally called, was finished in 1923 in 300 working days, a year early, and in such a rush that a train was said to have been accidentally buried beneath it. Wembley was just a vast concrete bowl, whose chief boast was being as high as the walls of Jericho.

It would have been rational to scrap Wembley. Most countries manage without a dedicated national stadium. England could have continued playing in wonderful grounds around the country, as they have during the rebuilding period. That would have been a rebellion against London’s domination of English life. Newcastle fans would have been spared the nine-hour round-trip to see their team lose finals. The Football Association would have saved £800m. Imagine how many pitches and changing-rooms it could have built across England.

But scrapping Wembley was unthinkable. Instead, a new Wembley was commissioned worthy of the new London. “No other city in Europe is transforming so much,” notes Herzog. A “famous architect” was called in: Norman Foster, who in more than 40 years of architectural practice had never built a stadium.

The delays turned the construction into an international farce. To give some idea of the scale of this, in 2004 a South African football official told me that the R1.2bn (currently £87m) his country would spend on all its stadiums for the world cup of 2010 was a fraction of the cost of Wembley alone. Three years later, South Africa’s bill has somehow risen to R9bn (£654m) but that is still less than Wembley’s. Brian Barwick, the FA’s chief executive, resorted to jokes about the matter. Musing at the FT’s business of sport conference last year about England’s chances of hosting the 2018 world cup, he said: “There’s even a theory that Wembley will be finished by then.”

Finally complete, the new stadium looks wonderful even if the emotional point of building it was to have continuity with the old Wembley and Foster seems to have ignored that. The old ground’s hallmarks were its twin towers. “We all look forward to many more years of the twin towers,” Tony Blair had said, before construction started. Unfortunately Foster tore them down. “The towers were emblematic at their time,” he conceded, “but that was a long time ago and things have moved on.”

Herzog believes that it is details such as the towers that make a stadium feel like home to fans: Old Trafford’s “Munich clock” and the sign in Liverpool’s tunnel saying “This is Anfield” are other examples. But Simon Inglis has “no sadness at all” about their demise, desribing it as “a bad design by a bad architect who didn’t know what he was doing.”

Can the new Wembley achieve emotional continuity with the old one? Simon Inglis says: “Yes, in the sense that the approach to the new stadium is the same as the old one, and so the routes and habits and everyday experience of Wembley-goers have not changed. In every other respect, no. It’s a completely new building in a new environment. I don’t think that once you’re inside the new stadium there is any continuity with the old one.”

This is not a problem, Inglis believes. “We knew [the old Wembley] as a ramshackle old building which had a certain familiarity. It has been replaced by a gleaming new corporate building which seems quite cold and clinical. But I daresay if you’d have gone there in 1923 you’d have had the same reaction.”

At Wembley many decades are present simultaneously. Next week’s game is incidental, a mere quotation of past games. In 1996, I went with an American friend to see England play Germany in the semi-final of the European Championship. On the Tube to the ground, fans were singing, as if it were June 1940,

Who do you think you are kidding Mr Hitler,

 If you think old England’s done?

And when we got to our seats, bad ones above the corner-flag, we saw behind us, in even worse seats, two legends of Wembley. “The big man in the raincoat,” I told my American friend, “the one swaying to the tune of ‘Three Lions on a Shirt’, is Geoff Hurst. He scored a hat-trick for England against Germany here in the 1966 World Cup final. The little guy next to him who looks like a bank clerk is Martin Peters. He scored England’s other goal. It’s a bit like sitting three rows ahead of Abraham Lincoln and Benjamin Franklin.” After 90 minutes the game was tied, and while the players were being massaged before extra time began, everyone in the crowd reminded each other of what England’s manager Alf Ramsey had told his team at the same stage in 1966: “You’ve beaten them once. Now go out there and beat them again.” England won 4-2.

Eighty years from now, in all likelihood, people will tell stories about something the Manchester United winger Cristiano Ronaldo did in the 2007 FA Cup final, and old women will remember their dead mothers who took them to the game. By then London may be turning into desert but Wembley will be the same, complete with the same old queues at the Tube station and the urine on my door.

An overarching architectural perspective

Wembley has been a site in search of an icon for more than a century, perhaps now, with its sweeping arch, it can finally rest easy, writes Edwin Heathcote.

In the 1880s, it was the site of an ambitious scheme for a structure to overshadow the Eiffel Tower. Only the base materialised and this abandoned folly became an attraction in its own right until it was dynamited in 1907. The Empire Exhibition of 1924 was an attempt to rally the country after the trauma of the first world war and its centrepiece was the white bulk of Wembley Stadium capped by its own mini twin-towers. Encased in a concrete shell that evoked the city of New Delhi, which Edwin Lutyens was then building – a British fudge of art deco, classical and colonial – it was a huge stadium intended as a showcase for nation and empire, though its original official 127,000 capacity was reduced long ago by the abolition of the old terraces.

The new building is designed by Foster and Partners, probably the world’s preeminent architecture practice. It is another typically British construction, in which the form is a dramatisation of the structural and mechanical requirements, late British High Tech. The architects have achieved a rare thing, a stadium suitable (with some adaptation) for athletics as well as football and it is a building that very seriously questions the need for an new Olympic stadium in east London, which will inevitably become defunct once the games are over.

The focus, however, is on football. The arena is an elegant, shallow bowl that belies its huge size – it is twice as big as the Stade de France in Paris (and with a far better relationship of arena to pitch), comfortably seating 90,000. It is also, with its retractable roof, a building equipped to cope with British weather and global warming.

Despite being the home of the beautiful game, Britain has a less than beautiful heritage of grounds. There has been nothing in this country to match the architectural delight of Eduardo Souto de Moura’s stadium for Braga in Portugal, a breathtaking arena carved into the side of a rock face on the site of a former quarry, or Herzog & de Meuron’s sensual cushion-clad stadium for Bayern Munich, a soft-shelled building with a heart of brilliantly pure concrete that, chameleon-like, changes colour according to who’s playing.

Milan’s San Siro and Madrid’s Bernabéu are among the cultural landmarks of Europe. However, they are club stadiums first and it is easier to produce something rooted in place and culture with a club that has a devoted local fanbase. Far harder is to create a national stadium on a blank site, a building that must somehow embody the qualities of a placeless national team. After its elephantine gestation, Wembley has the opportunity to galvanise the nation once more. That is, after all, a triumphal arch, isn’t it?" retirado de, simplesmente o mais conceituado jornal de economia do planeta terra, Financial Times
I belive SC BRAGA can fly... I belive SC BRAGA can toutch the sky...
Stk
Stk Equipa Principal
  • *****
  • 3624
  • Em Braga só baixámos a cabeça pra beijar o símbolo
  Re: o nosso MÁGICO Estádio AXA no jornal de economia Financial Times
« Responder #1 em: 16 de Julho de 2008, 00:33 »
Jesus , tanto texto , ainda por cima em ingles.. ninguem vai ler isso tudo  ;D ;D
Anuncios M
Anuncios M
(S)oon(C)hampions(B)raga Equipa Principal
  • *****
  • 4986
  Re: o nosso MÁGICO Estádio AXA no jornal de economia Financial Times
« Responder #2 em: 16 de Julho de 2008, 00:34 »
Jesus , tanto texto , ainda por cima em ingles.. ninguem vai ler isso tudo  ;D ;D

eu li!!! e gostei!!! mas vou tentar traduzir para português e já coloco aqui essa versão ;)
I belive SC BRAGA can fly... I belive SC BRAGA can toutch the sky...
Kilo
  Re: o nosso MÁGICO Estádio AXA no jornal de economia Financial Times
« Responder #3 em: 16 de Julho de 2008, 00:52 »
Jesus , tanto texto , ainda por cima em ingles.. ninguem vai ler isso tudo  ;D ;D


 Basta leres a parte destacada, o resto é palha para inglês saborear  ;D
Anuncios V
(S)oon(C)hampions(B)raga Equipa Principal
  • *****
  • 4986
  Re: o nosso MÁGICO Estádio AXA no jornal de economia Financial Times
« Responder #4 em: 16 de Julho de 2008, 00:53 »
é traduzido online... não está perfeito... mas dá para perceber para quem tem dificuldades a inglês...

`Você bateu-os uma vez. Faça-o agora outra vez… '
Por Simon Kuper Publicado: Maio 11 2007 18:05 | Último actualizado: Maio 11 2007 18:05

Com seu muito primeiro fósforo, o estádio de Wembley adquiriu seu mito de definição. A história “do final do cavalo branco”, do final da Taça 1923 do FA entre os Wanderers de Bolton e o presunto ocidental unidos, vale a pena examinar para o que revela sobre o lugar de Wembley na psique britânica. O que aconteceu era um disastre próximo: até 240.000 povos crammed na terra, quase duas vezes capacidade de Wembley naquele tempo, e provavelmente multidão a maior nunca em um fósforo de futebol. Havia um esmagamento e quase 1.000 víctimas foram tratadas. Mas, de acordo com o mito, distante mais mau eram os agradecimentos evitados ao polícia de polícia montado George Scorey e a seu cavalo branco. Junto empurraram para trás os milhares que derramam sobre ao passo antes do fósforo “agora, aqueles na parte dianteira juntam-se às mãos,” Scorey chamaram. Fizeram e começaram a recuar ponto por ponto. “O cavalo era muito bom,” Scorey recordou em 1944, “facilitando os para trás com seu nariz e sua cauda.” Bolton ganhou 2-0, ajudado, ele é dita, pelo desengate impar de um oponente ou passagem dizer das hordas reunidas no touchline. “O final do cavalo branco” forneceu Wembley o mito perfeito.

O cavalo evoca a apelação intemporal do estádio: tão velho a respeito de seja quase pre-tecnologia. As hordas representam a paixão maciça. E a definição delicada da história evoca o espírito ostentando de Wembley: no lugar da altercação, harmonia. Quase excepcionalmente entre as terras de futebol do mundo, Wembley não abriga um clube. É não-partidário, o estádio nacional, sentando-se acima do jogo. Mas por quase sete anos os Ingleses foram sem Wembley. Em 2000, após uma última derrota desânimo de encontro a Alemanha, o estádio velho foi demulido. O próximo fim de semana, entretanto, a custo de £800m e de quatro anos atrasado, o Wembley novo hospedará seu primeiro final da Taça do FA, quando jogo Chelsea de Manchester United. A tarefa do Wembley novo é preservar o espírito do velho: para ser um santuário a Britishness, antepassado-adore, e ao fandom próprio. É apropriado que o Wembley novo abrirá oficialmente com um final da Taça do FA porque o final foi sempre o ritual principal do estádio. O jogo é um rito da mola da celebração, visto que os fósforos internacionais, igualmente jogados em Wembley, tendem a ser noites do outono da angústia. O final da Taça do FA pertence a todos no futebol inglês. As dúzias dos clubes jogaram nele e seus suportes todos cantam as mesmas canções sobre ele: De “soros Que, soros,” “nós agitá-los-emos realmente up/When que nós ganhamos o copo do FA,” e, antes que o jogo próprio, no uníssono, o hino “habite comigo.” Esta harmonia é original em uma indústria cujo conduzir a paixão seja ódio: sempre para os oponentes, frequentemente para seu estádio (os ventiladores da cidade de Manchester serenaded o bombardeio do tempo de guerra da terra de Manchester United), às vezes para sua própria equipe, e mesmo para o senhor mesmo para prestar-lhes atenção. Somente Wembley transcende este. Os ventiladores rituais no dia do final da Taça do FA são constantes. Por anos eu vivi apenas fora da rua do padeiro em Londres central, o lugar onde os suportes recolhem antes de cramming sobre aos trens do tubo limitados para Wembley. Beberiam a cerveja no sol e então, à procura de uma rua secundária discreto, vêm e urinam de encontro a minha casa.

Uma vez que eu scolded um urinator de minha janela: “Acessível não é, se você não vive aqui?” “É muito conveniente, sim,” respondeu. Eu sou certo que os povos estavam urinando lá em 1923. Wembley contem o passado do futebol mas igualmente o passado pessoal do ventilador. Quando você vai a um estádio, você recorda ser tomada lá como uma criança. Aquele é muito do ponto de ser um ventilador de esportes. Quanto outros edifícios você visitam toda sua vida? Como o poeta holandês Henk Spaan do futebol escreveu, um estádio é Um monumento a todos os pais que estão já inoperantes Um monumento ao homem comum. E o que quer que estava acontecendo em Grâ Bretanha de 1923 a 2000, Wembley era sempre lá, stolid, feio e suburbano. Junho em 8 1940, os alemães pareceram no ponto de invadir Grâ Bretanha. Já invadiam France, e o corpo expedicionário britânico tinha fujido apenas Dunkirk em uma armada de barcos pequenos. Mas essa tarde, 42.399 suportes do futebol, na negação heróico da realidade, estava no presunto ocidental de observação v Blackburn do estádio de Wembley no final da Taça da guerra. Durante a primeira metade, a palavra foi em volta da multidão que um anúncio importante devia ser feita em de meio expediente. Roy Peskett, um sportswriter que atende, pensamento talvez que os alemães tinham aterrado. Em lugar do anunciador disse: “Há seis heróis aqui hoje. Homens que apenas voltaram de Dunkirk, sido aos depósitos e começ reaparelhados, e vindo aqui prestar atenção ao fósforo de futebol!” Como a maioria de tradições britânicas, Wembley foi apreciado frequentemente mais por estrangeiros. Pele, que nunca jogou um fósforo lá, tomou uma vez uma esfera sobre ao passo vazio e, como um aluno que finge ser Pele, retrocedeu-a na rede vazia. Chamou o estádio “a igreja do futebol”.

Em Istambul uma vez, eu encontrei Fatih Uraz, guarda-redes de Turquia no dia onde perderam 8-0 a Inglaterra em Wembley em 1987. Era aquele o dia o mais mau de sua carreira? “No.!” Uraz dito. “Era uma memória agradável para mim, porque eu mostrei meu esforço. Toda minha carreira que eu quis jogar em Wembley. Se eu começ a outra oportunidade de jogar lá, mesmo se eu concedi 15 objetivos, nenhum problema.” Contudo o Wembley velho teve que ir. Após o disastre de Hillsborough de 1989, em que 96 ventiladores de Liverpool foram esmagados à morte em um estádio antiquado, biliões de libras foram gastados que modernizam terras de futebol britânicas grandes. Um processo similar aconteceu nos E.U. no tempo mais ou menos idêntico - “o renascimento da estimativa” - e em torno de Europa. Jacques Herzog, arquiteto suíço que em 2001 com seu amigo Pierre de Meuron da infância ganhou o prêmio de Pritzker principalmente para projetar o museu de arte do Tate Modern de Londres, estádio de Munich projetado para o copo de mundo do ano passado, Basileia para o campeonato europeu do futebol do próximo ano e está terminando agora o estádio olímpico de Beijing. Sua terra de Basileia, disse-me que, “era o primeiro dos estádios de futebol novos a ser construídos por um arquiteto famoso. Um estádio tem o potencial ser como um teatro da ópera. Ninguém disse nunca aquele antes.” Significou que visto que as cidades derivaram uma vez o status de suas catedrais, e mais tarde de seus teatros da ópera, eles faz agora assim de seus estádios. Ao lado destas arenas novas, Wembley olhou embaraçoso.

Como a maioria de terras de futebol britânicas idosas, ele datado de uma era quando os estádios foram construídos no barato, sem pretensões arquitectónicas. “Por muitos anos, dentro do esporte britânico especial, os arquitetos do estádio foram olhados para baixo em cima com de quase tanto desprezo como os journalistas,” dizem Simon Inglis, autor das terras de futebol seminais de Inglaterra e de Wales e de diversos outros livros no assunto (poucos tópicos são assim que dominado por um escritor, evidência de como, até relativamente recentemente, os estádios foram negligenciados). O estádio do império, enquanto foi chamado original, foi terminado em 1923 em 300 dias de trabalho, um ano adiantado, e em tal arremetida que um trem foi dito ter sido enterrado acidentalmente abaixo dele. Wembley era apenas uma bacia concreta vasta, cujo o inchaço principal fosse tão elevado quanto as paredes de Jericho. Seria racional desfazer-se de Wembley. A maioria de países controlam sem um estádio nacional dedicado. Inglaterra poderia ter continuado o jogo em terras maravilhosas em torno do país, como têm durante o período de reconstrução. Aquela seria uma rebelião de encontro à dominação de Londres da vida inglesa. Os ventiladores de Newcastle seriam poupados o round-trip nine-hour para ver sua equipe perder finais.

A associação do futebol conservaria £800m. Imagine quantos passos e vestiário poderia ter construído através de Inglaterra. Mas desfazer-se de Wembley era inconcebível. Em lugar de, um Wembley novo era digno comissão da Londres nova. “Nenhuma outra cidade em Europa está transformando tanto,” anota Herzog. “Um arquiteto famoso” foi chamado em: Os normandos promovem, que em mais de 40 anos de prática arquitectónica tinham construído nunca um estádio. Os atrasos transformaram a construção em uma farsa internacional. Para dar alguma idéia da escala desta, em 2004 um sul - o oficial de futebol africano disse-me que que o R1.2bn (atualmente £87m) que seu país gastaria em todos seus estádios para o copo de mundo de 2010 era uma fração do custo de Wembley sozinho. Três anos mais tarde, a conta de África do Sul levantou-se de algum modo a R9bn (£654m) mas aquele é ainda menos do que Wembley. Brian Barwick, o executivo principal do FA, recorrido aos gracejos sobre a matéria.

Reflexão no negócio do FT da conferência do esporte o ano passado sobre possibilidades de Inglaterra de hospedar o copo 2018 de mundo, disse: “Há mesmo uma teoria que Wembley estará terminado até lá.” Finalmente completo, o estádio novo olha maravilhoso mesmo se o ponto emocional do edifício ele era ter a continuidade com o Wembley velho e adoptivo parece ter ignorado isso. As indicações da terra velha eram suas torres gémeas. “Nós que todos olham para a frente a muito mais anos das torres gémeas,” Tony Blair dissemos, antes que a construção começou. Infelizmente adoptivo rasgou-os para baixo. “As torres eram emblemáticas em seu tempo,” concedeu, “mas aquele era há muito tempo e as coisas moveram-se sobre.” Herzog acredita que é detalhes tais como as torres que fazem um estádio sentir como o repouso aos ventiladores: De “o pulso de disparo Munich” de Trafford velho e o sinal no túnel de Liverpool que diz “este são Anfield” são outros exemplos.

Mas Simon Inglis não tem “nenhuma tristeza de todo” sobre sua cessão, desribing a como “um projeto mau por um arquiteto mau que não saiba o que fazia.” Pode o Wembley novo conseguir a continuidade emocional com velha? Simon Inglis diz: “Sim, no sentido que a aproximação ao estádio novo é a mesma que velha, e assim que as rotas e os hábitos e a experiência diária dos Wembley-frequentadores não mudaram. Em cada outro respeito, no. É um buildin completamente novo em um ambiente novo. Eu não penso que uma vez que você é dentro do estádio novo há qualquer continuidade com velha.” Este não é um problema, Inglis acredita. “Nós soubemos [o Wembley velho] como um edifício velho desorganizado que tivesse alguma familiaridade. Foi substituído por um edifício incorporado novo brilhando que parecesse completamente frio e clínico. Mas I daresay se você iria lá em 1923 você teria a mesma reação.” Em Wembley muitas décadas estão atuais simultaneamente. O jogo da próxima semana é incidental, uma mera citação de jogos passados. Em 1996, eu fui com um amigo americano ver o jogo Alemanha de Inglaterra no semi-final do campeonato europeu. No tubo à terra, os ventiladores estavam cantando, como se era junho 1940, Quem você pensam você está caçoando o Sr. Hitler,   se você pensa Inglaterra velha feita? E quando nós começ a nossos assentos, mau uns acima da canto-bandeira, nós vimos atrás de nós, mesmo em uns assentos mais maus, duas legendas de Wembley. “O homem grande no raincoat,” eu disse meu amigo americano, “esse que balanç até a quantia dos leões do `três em um Shirt', é Geoff Hurst. Marc chapéu-engana para Inglaterra de encontro a Alemanha aqui no final da Taça 1966 do mundo.

O indivíduo pequeno ao lado dele que olha como um caixeiro de banco é Martin Peters. Marc o outro objetivo de Inglaterra. É um pouco como o assento de três fileiras antes de Abraham Lincoln e Benjamin Franklin.” Após 90 minutos onde o jogo foi amarrado, e quando os jogadores eram feitos massagens antes do tempo adicional começou, todos na multidão lembrou-se do que o gerente Alf Ramsey de Inglaterra tinha dito a sua equipe no mesmo estágio em 1966: “Você bateu-os uma vez. Sai agora e bate-os outra vez.” Inglaterra ganhou 4-2. Oitenta anos a partir de agora, em toda a probabilidade, os povos dirão a histórias sobre algo o extremo Cristiano que de Manchester United Ronaldo fêz no final da Taça 2007 do FA, e as mulheres adultas recordarão suas mães inoperantes que as tomaram ao jogo. Até lá Londres pode transformar no deserto mas Wembley estará o mesmo, completo com as mesmas filas velhas na estação de metro e na urina em minha porta. Uma perspectiva arquitectónica overarching Wembley foi um local à procura de um ícone para mais do que um século, talvez agora, com seu arco arrebatador, pode finalmente descansar fácil, escreve Edwin Heathcote. Nos 1880s, era o local de um esquema ambicioso para que uma estrutura overshadow a torre Eiffel. Somente a base materializou e este insensatez abandonado transformou-se uma atração em seus direitos próprios até que dynamited em 1907. A exposição do império de 1924 era uma tentativa de reagrupar o país após o traumatismo da primeira guerra de mundo e sua peça central era o volume branco do estádio de Wembley tampado por suas próprias mini gêmeo-torres. Encerrado em um escudo concreto que evocasse a cidade de Nova Deli, que Edwin que Lutyens o construia então - um fudge britânico do art deco, clássico e do colonial - era um estádio enorme pretendido como uma mostra para a nação e o império, embora sua capacidade original do oficial 127.000 foi reduzida há muito tempo pela abolição dos terraços velhos. O edifício novo é projetado por adoptiva e por sócios, provavelmente a prática preeminente da arquitetura do mundo. É uma outra construção tipicamente britânica, em que o formulário é um dramatisation das exigências estruturais e mecânicas, alta tecnologia britânica atrasada. Os arquitetos conseguiram uma coisa rara, um estádio apropriado (com alguma adaptação) para o atletismo assim como o futebol e é um edifício que questione muito seriamente a necessidade para um estádio olímpico novo em Londres do leste, que se tornará inevitàvel defunto uma vez os jogos se acaba. O foco, entretanto, está no futebol. A arena é uma bacia elegante, rasa que desminta seu tamanho enorme - é duas vezes mais grande que o Stade de France em Paris (e com um relacionamento distante melhor da arena ao passo), assentando confortavelmente 90.000. É igualmente, com seu telhado retrátil, um edifício equipado para lidar com o tempo britânico e aquecimento global. Apesar de ser o repouso do jogo bonito, Grâ Bretanha tem uma herança menos do que bonita das terras.

Não houve nada neste país combinar o prazer arquitectónico do estádio de Eduardo Souto de Moura para Braga em Portugal, uma arena excitante cinzelada no lado de uma cara da rocha no local de uma pedreira anterior, ou do & de Herzog; estádio coxim-folheado sensual de de Meuron para Baviera Munich, um edifício soft-shelled com um coração do concreto brilhante puro que, chameleon-como, mude a cor de acordo com quem está jogando.

 Bernabéu de San Siro e de Madrid de Milão está entre os marcos culturais de Europa. Entretanto, são estádios do clube primeiramente e é mais fácil produzir algo enraizado no lugar e a cultura com um clube que tenha um fanbase local devotado. É distante mais duramente criar um estádio nacional em um local em branco, um edifício que deva de algum modo personificar as qualidades de uma equipa nacional placeless. Após sua gestação elefantina, Wembley tem a oportunidade de galvanizar uma vez mais a nação. Isto é, apesar de tudo, um arco triunfal, não é?
I belive SC BRAGA can fly... I belive SC BRAGA can toutch the sky...
SCM Equipa Principal
  • *****
  • 1296
  Re: o nosso MÁGICO Estádio AXA no jornal de economia Financial Times
« Responder #5 em: 16 de Julho de 2008, 16:08 »
É muita fruta.
É bom viver o Braga.
(S)oon(C)hampions(B)raga Equipa Principal
  • *****
  • 4986
  Re: o nosso MÁGICO Estádio AXA no jornal de economia Financial Times
« Responder #6 em: 19 de Julho de 2008, 21:52 »
É muita fruta.

mas mesmo assim nem um quote na imprensa escrita, falada, audivisual portuguesa...

incrível né??

agora sobre o ciganito da pascoa estar chatiadinho pq quer sair dos tripeidos, ou que o nuno "maria alice" gomes tá com fé na boa época do slbostas inundam-nos constantemente  ::)
I belive SC BRAGA can fly... I belive SC BRAGA can toutch the sky...
Cici
Cici Equipa Principal
  • *****
  • 2899
  Re: o nosso MÁGICO Estádio AXA no jornal de economia Financial Times
« Responder #7 em: 30 de Julho de 2008, 01:43 »
Meus Deus, texto enorme.
Mas ainda bem que a parte que interessava estava marcada e sublinhada a vermelho, por isso passei logo adiante.
Realmente é impressioante a obra do arq. Souto Moura, nada antes tinha sido feito nem parecido, e esta notícia publicada no Financial Times, só mostra o reconhecimento disso mesmo.
É e será uma mais-valia para a cidade.
Anuncios M
Anuncios M
Bracaraugustano
Bracaraugustano Equipa Principal
  • *****
  • 1290
  Re: o nosso MÁGICO Estádio AXA no jornal de economia Financial Times
« Responder #8 em: 30 de Julho de 2008, 11:06 »
West Ham United  = "Presunto Ocidental Unidos" ahahahahaahahha!!!!! Isto de usar tradutores da net dá nisto.

De resto, a parte sobre o estádio do Braga está mais ao menos perceptível.
É sempre bom ler algo bom sobre as nossas coisas em publicações tão prestigiadas quanto a Finantial Times.
MrCasp Juniores
  • ***
  • 575
  Re: o nosso MÁGICO Estádio AXA no jornal de economia Financial Times
« Responder #9 em: 30 de Julho de 2008, 12:58 »
West Ham United  = "Presunto Ocidental Unidos" ahahahahaahahha!!!!! Isto de usar tradutores da net dá nisto.

De resto, a parte sobre o estádio do Braga está mais ao menos perceptível.
É sempre bom ler algo bom sobre as nossas coisas em publicações tão prestigiadas quanto a Finantial Times.

 :D :D :D
acho que nenhum comediante diria melhor  ;D
 

Anuncios M
Anuncios M